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Punctuation Workshop

Ahavati
Ahavati
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nomoth said:thank you.. i do like this...gonna bury my dirty nerd nose in this and in no way contentiously.... *pushes you awkwardly in the back*


edit: jokingly-to get on with it.



Waiting on Tallen's mic-drop research!


poet Anonymous

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poet Anonymous

Ahavati, are you even human? That's an insane amount of nerdgasmic info! That was beautiful to read, thank you so much for the time it must have taken to put that together. I'm guessing that was effortless effort though. I love language, specifically English, it's such a malleable and updates itself regularly.  It's a living language rooted in ancient language.

I love sanskrit, how eloquent yet efficient,  french is like wiping your arse with silk and polish, I've recently found out, is autistically direct.

And yet, the unsung hero of language, of English, specifically here, since we're using it commonly, is punctuation. It is a universal language within our language.

I did a tiny bit of looking around Isidore of Seville, and the Aristophanes. Their rerelease of their third album, "How to make people stop or pause with dots and dashes" was a great hit.

This is awesome!

Has anyone seen Arrival?

Ahavati
Ahavati
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LOL! Sky you're certifiable!  And I'm VERY human. 🙋 I just have a passion for language, writing, and learning.  Happy to know you do as well! This is going to be an awesome workshop! 📝❤

And, yes; I've seen Arrival. 👽

Blackwolf
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This is far older than most people think ;

That termed Obri , is the Women's desert "Hebrew"...Ayin Beth Resh Yod
is the original word that later became "Hebrew" ;

The 22 Runes that compare to them are far older than Norse or German ,
though that is what has been taught...

These two languages are the waveform languages , that are the secret
under many world cultures , and secret societies , including eastern ,
and "Om" is a word formed by a pairing of Runes , in a set structure ;

The meaning of the two symbols also defines what "Om" is said to mean

Which is how the Celtic language , "Ogham" is pronounced "Om"

As well , two Runes are pronounced Ur and Seal , and by layers of meaning
convey navigation , yet further , when fit together , make the shape of the
Dipper from one million years ago as shown by Carl Sagan in Cosmos...

Thus Urseal , today Ursa...

Now , we have a symbol set of Runes , two columns of eight symbols , each
with 77 levels of meaning...and one may ask "why is this important" ?

Because the four corner symbols of this dual eight arrangement , by number value , equal 159...and the number for "Point" in Obri , equals 159 via Gematria

Now those two columns of eight , have number values ;

603 and 391

If those are doubled , 1206 , and 782 ;

The difference between them is 424 , and the number value for the English
word "Writing" , put back into the old language , equals that ;

So we are looking at Writing and the Point...

There is far , far more to this code , known to the Masons from long , long ago , as well Native Americans , and many , many , others , and generally hidden...

All the various punctuation symbols are found within this code...

This is not the total of waveform shapes...

I will say this language was known by Da Vinci , as well the Alchemists called
it the Language of the Birds , or The Green Language...

This is what I have been teaching for 25 years , privately to students...

Just thought I would add something to the equation , to give an idea what
is today termed "Language" is far older than people think...

Best to all

Ahavati
Ahavati
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Brief Origin of the Modern Period

Aldus Manutius the Elder ( aka Aldo Manunzio, humanist, scholar, educator, and the founder of the Aldine Press ), and his grandson take credit for introducing the modern use of the period ( as well as several other punctuation marks we’ll be exploring ). In addition, he is also known as the inventor of the book during the establishment of printing in the 15th century. Venice was widely known as the European capital of the printing press, and many famous scholars and writers followed suit by utilizing the period in their own written works when books began replacing manuscripts. This encouraged the systematic use of English punctuation throughout the 16th & 17th centuries.

Use of the Period

A period ( or full stop ) is used at the end of any sentence that is intended to make a statement, instruction/command, or an indirect question. It is placed behind the last letter of the sentence followed by a space. Additionally, periods are also used in abbreviations, i.e.- Cherokee, N.C., etc.  

If the abbreviation ends a statement, instruction/command, or an indirect question, the period ending the abbreviation is also used to complete the sentence.

Ahavati lives in Cherokee, N.C.

In the case of acronyms, those pronounced as a word do not necessarily require periods between the letters: NASA, NATO, etc.  This also includes certain acronyms pronounced by individual letters: IRS, FBI, CIA, while others typically require letters: U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

Additional sources:

https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/renaissance-reformation/early-renaissance1/venice-early-ren/a/aldo-manuzio-aldus-manutius-inventor-of-the-modern-book

https://www.altalang.com/beyond-words/a-brief-history-of-english-punctuation/

https://qz.com/530350/the-origins-of-ellipses-commas-and-other-punctuation-marks/

https://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/use-period-correctly/

poet Anonymous

Thanks Miss! I forgot about abbreviations, yes, of course. Again, thanks.

JohnnyBlaze
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I think it would have been maddening to read prose prior to the advent of the period and lower case letters.

However, I'm glad to punt little Dottie out of the way when writing poetry, as I rarely use it.

Ahavati
Ahavati
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Sky, you're welcome! I have to brush up periodically, particularly when I haven't used them in a bit!

JohnnyBlaze said:I think it would have been maddening to read prose prior to the advent of the period and lower case letters.

However, I'm glad to punt little Dottie out of the way when writing poetry, as I rarely use it.


LOL! Perhaps not inviting little Dottie to begin with would be more gentlemanly!  

I agree, I believe it's been a few years since I've used it as well.  Though I did start out using her.

poet Anonymous

Why did we move away from punctuation in modern poetry then? Was it superfluous,  or left for the readers to do it when reading?

Tallen
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Sky_dancer said:Why did we move away from punctuation in modern poetry then? Was it superfluous,  or left for the readers to do it when reading?


i think i read somewhere that originally
Punctuation was added to make it easier
for a speaker to read texts aloud.

Ahavati
Ahavati
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Sky_dancer said:Why did we move away from punctuation in modern poetry then? Was it superfluous,  or left for the readers to do it when reading?

Loaded question, Sky; but, I love it!

I'm not so sure modern poetry moved away from punctuation.  Free verse ( or
vers libre ) types of poems have been around for hundreds of years, and do not follow the typical rules for poetry. Yet they're considered modern or contemporary poetry by many.  Perhaps it's an innate return to an origin of expression after experiencing the confines of rules? After all, rules are made to be broken!

At any rate, here's a terrific transcript on The History of Free Verse and The Battle Over Origin you might enjoy.  

https://prezi.com/ciit9t1kyjhd/the-history-of-free-verse-and-the-battle-over-origin/

Excerpt:

[ . . . ]

Avant Garde Free Verse, or Modern Free Verse, is argued to have begun, or been invented, in English by Walt Whitman, who modeled his long lines on the Bible and grand opera. Some claim he was the first to "proudly write nonmetrically".
Free Verse, as he was writing it at the time, was considered freakish.
Other critics argue that while Free verse became more commonly utilized in the 1900's, the history of free verse goes as far back as the King James bible since it was written with non-metrical verses.
One can also easily point to the structure of Odes, to see that free verse has long been prevalent in the tradition of poetry, although not necessarily called free verse.

[ . . . ]

_shadoe_
_shadoe_
katyusha
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oh dear god, class has started 😱 and there are sources! yay for extra reading.
i confess i hadn't thought ov acronyms 🤔 the u.n.i.c.e.f one throws me a bit... i'd have thought {given the pronunciation} it would be treated the same way as nasa or nato...
yay for learning stuff🍾🥂

Ahavati
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Tallen said:
i think i read somewhere that originally
Punctuation was added to make it easier
for a speaker to read texts aloud.


LOL!  I love you Tallen!  Second post of this thread, Sky!

JohnnyBlaze
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If it is crucial to the reader, it has purpose. The comma is somewhat crucial depending on where it is used and the period is hardly necessary. Everything else comes in quite handy.  

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