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Freedom of Speech and Censorship Part 2

Valeriyabeyond
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JohnnyBlaze said:

I can't even imagine. School in rural Illinois during the 70's was thoroughly White with the exception of a few Hispanics and painfully dull.



Exactly I grew up in Rockford from 1961-1970
I never saw a black person
literally had never seen an African American until I moved to California
I was sheltered to almost a criminal degree society wise

JohnnyBlaze
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Valeriyabeyond said:


Exactly I grew up in Rockford from 1961-1970
I never saw a black person
literally had never seen an African American until I moved to California
I was sheltered to almost a criminal degree society wise


I grew up not too far from Rockford, then left the area around 2011. The Hispanic population boomed, but still there were hardly any Blacks. I remember one Black couple in my entire subdivision over the course of 15 years.

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Ahavati said:Civil Rights Heroes

Happy Birthday Ruby Bridges! DID YOU KNOW? Ruby Bridges became the first African-American child to attend an all-white elementary school in the South.

In 1960, Ruby Bridges's parents were informed by officials from the NAACP that she was one of only six other African-American students to pass the test. Ruby would be the only African-American student to attend the William Frantz School, near her home. When the first day of school rolled around in September, Ruby was still at her old school. All through the summer and early fall, the Louisiana State Legislature had found ways to fight the federal court order and slow the integration process. After exhausting all stalling tactics, the Legislature had to relent, and the designated schools were to be integrated that November.

Fearing there might be some civil disturbances, the federal district court judge requested the U.S. government send federal marshals to New Orleans to protect the children. side note:

On the morning of November 14, 1960, federal marshals drove Ruby and her mother five blocks to her new school. While in the car, one of the men explained that when they arrived at the school, two marshals would walk in front of Ruby and two would be behind her.

The image of this small black girl being escorted to school by four large white men inspired Norman Rockwell to create the painting "The Problem We All Must Live With," which graced the cover of Look magazine in 1964.

When Ruby and the federal marshals arrived at the school, large crowds of people were gathered in front yelling and throwing objects. There were barricades set up, and policemen were everywhere. Ruby, in her innocence, first believed it was like a Mardi Gras celebration. When she entered the school under the protection of the federal marshals, she was immediately escorted to the principal's office and spent the entire day there. The chaos outside, and the fact that nearly all the white parents at the school had kept their children home, meant classes weren't going to be held.

OSTRACIZED AT SCHOOL

On her second day, the circumstances were much the same as the first, and for a while it looked like Ruby Bridges wouldn't be able to attend class. Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, agreed to teach Ruby. She was from Boston and a new teacher to the school. "Mrs. Henry," as Ruby would call her even as an adult, greeted her with open arms. Ruby was the only student in Henry's class, because parents pulled or threatened to pull their children from Ruby's class and send them to other schools. For a full year, Henry and Ruby sat side-by-side at two desks working on Ruby's lessons. She was very loving and supportive of Ruby, helping her not only with her studies, but also the difficult experience of being ostracized.

Ruby Bridges's first few weeks at Frantz School were not easy ones. Several times she was confronted with blatant racism in full view of her federal escorts. On her second day of school, a woman threatened to poison her. After this, the federal marshals allowed her to only eat food from home. On another day, she was "greeted" by a woman displaying a black doll in a wooden coffin. Ruby's mother kept encouraging her to be strong and pray while entering the school, which Ruby discovered reduced the vehemence of the insults yelled at her and gave her courage. She spent her entire day, every day, in Mrs. Henry's classroom, not allowed to go to the cafeteria or out to recess to be with other students in the school. When she had to go to the restroom, the federal marshals walked her down the hall. Several years later, federal marshal Charles Burks, one of her escorts, commented with some pride that Ruby showed a lot of courage. She never cried or whimpered. "She just marched along like a little soldier."

EFFECT ON THE BRIDGES FAMILY

The abuse wasn't limited to only Ruby Bridges; her family suffered as well. Her father lost his job at the filling station, and her grandparents were sent off the land they had sharecropped for over 25 years. The grocery store where the family shopped banned them from entering. However, many others in the community, both black and white, began to show support in a variety of ways. Gradually, many families began to send their children back to the school and the protests and civil disturbances seemed to subside as the year went on.

A neighbor provided Ruby's father with a job, while others volunteered to babysit the four children, watch the house as protectors, and walk behind the federal marshals on the trips to school.

After winter break, Ruby began to show signs of stress. She experienced nightmares and would wake her mother in the middle of the night seeking comfort. For a time, she stopped eating lunch in her classroom, which she usually ate alone. Wanting to be with the other students, she would not eat the sandwiches her mother packed for her, but instead hid them in a storage cabinet in the classroom. Soon, a janitor discovered the mice and cockroaches who had found the sandwiches. The incident led Mrs. Henry to lunch with Ruby in the classroom.

Ruby started seeing child psychologist Dr. Robert Coles, who volunteered to provide counseling during her first year at Frantz School. He was very concerned about how such a young girl would handle the pressure. He saw Ruby once a week either at school or at her home. During these sessions, he would just let her talk about what she was experiencing. Sometimes his wife came too and, like Dr. Coles, she was very caring toward Ruby. Coles later wrote a series of articles for Atlantic Monthly and eventually a series of books on how children handle change, including a children's book on Ruby's experience.

OVERCOMING OBSTACLES

Near the end of the first year, things began to settle down. A few white children in Ruby's grade returned to the school. Occasionally, Ruby got a chance to visit with them. By her own recollection many years later, Ruby was not that aware of the extent of the racism that erupted over her attending the school. But when another child rejected Ruby's friendship because of her race, she began to slowly understand.

By Ruby's second year at Frantz School it seemed everything had changed. Mrs. Henry's contract wasn't renewed, and so she and her husband returned to Boston. There were also no more federal marshals; Ruby walked to school every day by herself. There were other students in her second grade class, and the school began to see full enrollment again. No one talked about the past year. It seemed everyone wanted to put the experience behind them.

Ruby Bridges finished grade school, and graduated from the integrated Francis T. Nicholls High School in New Orleans. She then studied travel and tourism at the Kansas City business school and worked for American Express as a world travel agent. In 1984, Ruby married Malcolm Hall in New Orleans, and later became a full-time parent to their four sons.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS

In 1993, Ruby Bridges's youngest brother, Malcolm, was murdered in a drug-related killing. For a time, Ruby looked after Malcolm's four children who attended William Frantz School. She began to volunteer at the school three days a week and soon became a parent-community liaison. The coincidence of all this, to have her brother's death bring her back to her elementary school where so much had taken place, didn't escape Ruby, but she wasn't sure why all this happened.

In 1995, she got her answer. Robert Coles, Bridges's child psychologist, published a children's book on his time with her entitled The Story of Ruby Bridges. Soon after, Barbara Henry, her teacher that first year at Frantz School, contacted Bridges and they were reunited on the Oprah Winfrey show.

[ . . . ]

source: biography.com


bumping

Valeriyabeyond
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JohnnyBlaze said:

bumping


Took me a minute to finish reading this Ahavati
Doing other stuff too but the content and the way it was written kept drawing me back
Thanks Johnny for the bump it prompted me to sit and read it in it's entirety
I enjoyed it very much Thanks Ahavati for such an interesting post
Compelling history

It's confusing in a way in which society deals with race
Here we have Johnny and myself with virtually no contact with the black community growing up and we don't have a racist bone in our body
Then there are others in Wisconsin for example a stone's throw from Illinois who also had very little contact yet they are militia minded, white pride minded, bigotry on a genetic level
"Some" I'm not stereotyping Wisconsin or Illinois or the militia To all you militia minded I did not say you were racist.
It's interesting to see how society works it's particulars and what causes hatred amongst diversity
Will we ever know

Ahavati
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Valeriyabeyond said:
[ . . . ]
It's interesting to see how society works it's particulars and what causes hatred amongst diversity
Will we ever know


Fear.

Valeriyabeyond
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Ahavati said:

Fear.


🌹❤️

Blackwolf
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I was in New York ( Long Island ) mid 1950's / mid to late 1960's ;

Saw a number of black families , on the island...

After moving to Arizona , then Southern California / Northern California ,
back to east coast in 1972...Atlantic City , New Jersey ;

That year there were race riots in the area , and in the school...

I remember being threatened , and assaulted , because I had
no close contact with other races before then , and did not
understand prejudice due to race...

Yet , it did not turn me against anyone , other than those
who directly assaulted me...

I hitched across the United States in the 1970's , back and forth ,
and worked in many places with black people , including "Nawlin's"
( New Orleans ) , and Mississippi ( utility supervisor on Mississippi Queen )
and partied with many friends , and had wild times at Mardi Gras and Jazz Fest...

( *came to* ( after many various drugs and drink ) at the head of the
Snake Dance at the Jazz Fest , a long line of black brothers and sisters
holding onto my waist , and stretching back , with them yelling at me
with praise for my dancing )

I think *that* ( dancing ) always connected me to the black community ,
as well my interest in culture , and food ...fun was very important...

And laughter together...

I look back on those days , yet for all years since , have had not a racially
discriminatory bone in my body...nor would I...not any color , people ,
or cultural traditions...;)

Valeriyabeyond
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Blackwolf said:I was in New York ( Long Island ) mid 1950's / mid to late 1960's ;

Saw a number of black families , on the island...

After moving to Arizona , then Southern California / Northern California ,
back to east coast in 1972...Atlantic City , New Jersey ;

That year there were race riots in the area , and in the school...

I remember being threatened , and assaulted , because I had
no close contact with other races before then , and did not
understand prejudice due to race...

Yet , it did not turn me against anyone , other than those
who directly assaulted me...

I hitched across the United States in the 1970's , back and forth ,
and worked in many places with black people , including "Nawlin's"
( New Orleans ) , and Mississippi ( utility supervisor on Mississippi Queen )
and partied with many friends , and had wild times at Mardi Gras and Jazz Fest...

( *came to* ( after many various drugs and drink ) at the head of the
Snake Dance at the Jazz Fest , a long line of black brothers and sisters
holding onto my waist , and stretching back , with them yelling at me
with praise for my dancing )

I think *that* ( dancing ) always connected me to the black community ,
as well my interest in culture , and food ...fun was very important...

And laughter together...

I look back on those days , yet for all years since , have had not a racially
discriminatory bone in my body...nor would I...not any color , people ,
or cultural traditions...;)


Great post BW
Sounds enriching
I know Ahavati says fear promotes the racist views I do agree with that
What prompts some to absorb the fear to the point where it molds their being ? And others don't allow the fear to take hold even as young children it doesn't affect us that way
In your HO

Ahavati
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Valeriyabeyond said:

Great post BW
Sounds enriching
I know Ahavati says fear promotes the racist views I do agree with that
What prompts some to absorb the fear to the point where it molds their being ? And others don't allow the fear to take hold even as young children it doesn't affect us that way
In your HO


Exactly. Some overcome to the fear while others succumb to it.

Valeriyabeyond
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Ahavati said:

Exactly. Some overcome to the fear while others succumb to it.


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drone
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Rewrite

The Sexless God
doesn't enter us
from outside;
It  emerges
from deep within
us
It  is not held back
by what happened
in the past.
We are conceived
in consciousness,
born into hate,
learning to love

Nurtured by our
Higher Thinking.
We are integrity and value,
created and sustained
by the hard work
of personal growth
and the discipline of a life
that which tells us
We should never
Live  Life
in hope.

Marianne Williamson

Blackwolf
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Ahavati :

You may truly appreciate this ;

And maybe you know , maybe you don't...but this is great to me ;

And two people who are working / trying together ;

https://youtu.be/iwqBXUb1TdE

'Rednecks for Black Lives' Rallies White Southerners for Racial Justice | NowThis

Ahavati
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LOVED it! I'd seen some of the history researching Appalachia mission trips, but this compilation was great. You don't mess with hillbillies and rednecks! 😂

Blackwolf
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Ahavati said:LOVED it! I'd seen some of the history researching Appalachia mission trips, but this compilation was great. You don't mess with hillbillies and rednecks! 😂

Let alone Hillbillies , Rednecks , and Blacks !

Revolution , via Music and Dance...

( speaking of that thought , you know how Capoeira started ? )

Ahavati
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Blackwolf said:

Let alone Hillbillies , Rednecks , and Blacks !

Revolution , via Music and Dance...

( speaking of that thought , you know how Capoeira started ? )


They will fuck you up!

I had to google to refresh my mind! I couldn't remember what that meant! My daughter took dance for years so they studied all types of styles ( particularly in the jazz/freestyle class ).

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