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Freedom of Speech and Censorship Part 2

Ahavati
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Help Us Fight Disinformation [ Such as the former POST containing a quote by Trump wrongly attributed to BLM ]

We need to see what you see. Black Lives Matter is a central target of disinformation and you are a key line of defense. Report suspicious sites, stories, ads, social accounts, and posts about BLM.

https://blacklivesmatter.com/help-us-fight-disinformation/

PsycoticMastermind
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That's what it's all about these days. Disinformation. And it's mind numbing how much it gets parroted by quote Conservative unquote supporters.

What's not surprising is that they don't comprehend how much it actually BACKFIRES, causing more damage than good to their party.

Ahavati
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Yep ^ 👍

Guys, this is HUGE! This is the Deep South.  Seriously, my mother's people were from Mississippi; I lived there a few years before moving to England, and it influenced my life more than any other place I've ever lived.

Mississippi lawmakers clear path to remove Confederate emblem from state flag
The state House voted to remove the current flag Sunday and senators will decide if a new design without the rebel symbol will be commissioned

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.clarionledger.com/amp/3269788001

HUGE!

Blackwolf
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Ahavati said:Yep ^ 👍
Mississippi lawmakers clear path to remove Confederate emblem from state flag
The state House voted to remove the current flag Sunday and senators will decide if a new design without the rebel symbol will be commissioned

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.clarionledger.com/amp/3269788001

HUGE!


Yes , that is a major decision they made...

I lived in Louisiana , and worked on the Mississippi Queen Riverboat...

I know what that area was like back in the early 1970's...

I also know the Klan is still big there...

I wonder just what river mud this is going to dredge up ?

All for it , though...

cabcool
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Eddy Grant—Guyanese Pop Musician—Weighs-In On The Black/White Divide

Born 1948 March 5, Grant moved to the UK with his family in 1960.  R&B, the blues, and rock music guzzled his mind beyond his homeland tan singing, an Indo-Caribbean vocal style.  Inventor of ringbang, Eddy has found his niche in the world of music, navigating between the roles of pop star, reggae radical, and musical entrepreneur.

Eddy brings an amazing voice to the current colour storm, sharing insights about the role of the artist and the conditions that should lead to real change.  I daresay, it's an intellectual discourse, perhaps a bit discursive, but worth a listen/viewing.  He talks about reparations being among the hopeful pieces of evidence of real change. See video link below.

View video:
https://youtu.be/t8psFw37yLI

The views expressed are not necessarily my own.

JohnnyBlaze
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cabcool said:Eddy Grant—Guyanese Pop Musician—Weighs-In On The Black/White Divide

Born 1948 March 5, Grant moved to the UK with his family in 1960.  R&B, the blues, and rock music guzzled his mind beyond his homeland tan singing, an Indo-Caribbean vocal style.  Inventor of ringbang, Eddy has found his niche in the world of music, navigating between the roles of pop star, reggae radical, and musical entrepreneur.

Eddy brings an amazing voice to the current colour storm, sharing insights about the role of the artist and the conditions that should lead to real change.  I daresay, it's an intellectual discourse, perhaps a bit discursive, but worth a listen/viewing.  He talks about reparations being among the hopeful pieces of evidence of real change. See video link below.

View video:
https://youtu.be/t8psFw37yLI

The views expressed are not necessarily my own.


OMG i have always loved his "Electric Avenue"!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gldHHrqacbA

It is such a great song that gets one fired up, thinking outside their own box about global dispariities.

Ahavati
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cabcool said:Eddy Grant—Guyanese Pop Musician—Weighs-In On The Black/White Divide

Born 1948 March 5, Grant moved to the UK with his family in 1960.  R&B, the blues, and rock music guzzled his mind beyond his homeland tan singing, an Indo-Caribbean vocal style.  Inventor of ringbang, Eddy has found his niche in the world of music, navigating between the roles of pop star, reggae radical, and musical entrepreneur.

Eddy brings an amazing voice to the current colour storm, sharing insights about the role of the artist and the conditions that should lead to real change.  I daresay, it's an intellectual discourse, perhaps a bit discursive, but worth a listen/viewing.  He talks about reparations being among the hopeful pieces of evidence of real change. See video link below.

View video:
https://youtu.be/t8psFw37yLI

The views expressed are not necessarily my own.


Thanks for sharing, cabcool. I appreciate it. I have prided myself on truly listening with the intent of understanding throughout this entire ordeal ( with the exception of trolls, etc. ).  When I first listen to him, I must admit I had to go meditate, pray, and clear my energy because I was angry at such a judgmental person. While I cannot speak for anyone else,  I found his accusation that white people who are protesting are only doing so to dethrone Trump and care nothing about black lives highly offensive. While that may indeed be the motive for some; it certainly isn't for all.

Those of us with close black friends, or black family, or just compassionate human beings certainly do care about black lives and want to see justice prevail.

In regards to what we should call black people, I call them Black because they have asked me to. And I don't think it's up to Eddy to dictate what I call them when I've been specifically asked to call them black. Perhaps that's a personal beef; I'm unsure.

I was quite shocked by this, to be honest; however, I do understand the frustration and built up resentment in regards to the white man destroying everything. I actually agreed with that statement. White men have practically destroyed everything they've touched, from peaceful indigenous people's who trusted their arrival to kidnapping and enslaving them as animals to use for profiteering. I wish with all my heart I could say I didn't agree with him on that, but unfortunately for my race, I do.

I do enjoy his music and actually lived in England in the late 60's when his first number one song hit, Baby Come Back. He is right in that you don't have to like him to enjoy his music; however, I do quite like him, as well as his forthright honesty.

Thanks for sharing.

EdibleWords
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According to FBI data, Blacks kill other Blacks at a higher rate (90 percent) than any other race. However, the same is true for white-on-white murders, which the FBI estimates are 82 percent of murders committed by whites.

https://www.diversityinc.com/conservatives-black-lives-matter-white-americans-despise-blm/

The above STUPID quote was a perfect example of how traitors within the conservative movement are destroying our message.

https://www.diversityinc.com/conservatives-black-lives-matter-white-americans-despise-blm/

Bad - wrong - info.

Rather 82% of murdered whites are victims of whites. That is very different than the way they phrased it.

Ahavati
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cabcool said:Eddy Grant—Guyanese Pop Musician—Weighs-In On The Black/White Divide
[. . .]


One last thing I had forgotten to mention ( it's been bugging me all day ) was his statement that no real change ever having been accomplished by protesting. He then referenced MLK.

I am uncertain how he came to that conclusion, because the Voting Rights Act was signed into law only 7 months after MLK's tactics of  awareness campaigns, peaceful protests, sit-ins, and court action. President Johnson even said it was “a triumph for freedom as huge as any victory that has ever been won on any battlefield”

Everything that has changed in this country has been by protest and resistance. Look at the Women's Suffrage and Affirmative Action movement. America's history is FILLED with movements that changed our country forever.

It appears that he has some personal beef with America. I could be wrong; however, some of the things he said just weren't true. I don't agree with much of what he said outside of the white man, but I do respect his right to say it.

I apologize for the second post, but I assume you've already read the first; thusly, editing would've been in vain.

JohnnyBlaze
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Regarding the Eddy Grant monologue?

I felt he was unnecessarily lumping people into groups. I'm as white as you can get, American, and I'm ( only ) showing my support for Blacks ( albeit through the Internets ). Trump is reducing his chances of being re-elected all on his own.

I also agree with Ahavati that peaceful protests and marches having made an impact - but I want to add that such is a way for people of different skin colors to stand together united in a common cause, which Grant seems to be overlooking in his disdain. Blacks benefit from knowing that most Whites have their backs rather than wondering what the hell we are doing holed up in our houses.

And Blacks or Whites have to be out in the street raising their voices to get the movement started so the Whites or Blacks can join in.

A LOT can be accomplished on the Internet, but ....

it's. just. not. the. same.


EdibleWords
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JohnnyBlaze said:Regarding the Eddy Grant monologue?

I felt he was unnecessarily lumping people into groups. I'm as white as you can get, American, and I'm ( only ) showing my support for Blacks ( albeit through the Internets ). Trump is reducing his chances of being re-elected all on his own.

I also agree with Ahavati that peaceful protests and marches having made an impact - but I want to add that such is a way for people of different skin colors to stand together united in a common cause, which Grant seems to be overlooking in his disdain. Blacks benefit from knowing that most Whites have their backs rather than wondering what the hell we are doing holed up in our houses.

And Blacks or Whites have to be out in the street raising their voices to get the movement started so the Whites or Blacks can join in.

A LOT can be accomplished on the Internet, but ....

it's. just. not. the. same.



Conservatives for black lives, pay heed.

Ahavati
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JohnnyBlaze said:Regarding the Eddy Grant monologue?

I felt he was unnecessarily lumping people into groups. I'm as white as you can get, American, and I'm ( only ) showing my support for Blacks ( albeit through the Internets ). Trump is reducing his chances of being re-elected all on his own.

I also agree with Ahavati that peaceful protests and marches having made an impact - but I want to add that such is a way for people of different skin colors to stand together united in a common cause, which Grant seems to be overlooking in his disdain. Blacks benefit from knowing that most Whites have their backs rather than wondering what the hell we are doing holed up in our houses.

And Blacks or Whites have to be out in the street raising their voices to get the movement started so the Whites or Blacks can join in.

A LOT can be accomplished on the Internet, but ....

it's. just. not. the. same.



I agree. Many a white have lost their life standing with and defending blacks (  think Viola Liuzzo among many others ).  I was also a bit surprised at how he went after Obama, but didn't mention it because, strangely, that felt like brother to brother and it seemed intrusive.  Color had nothing to do with that feeling as much as family and heritage.

cabcool
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JohnnyBlaze said:

OMG i have always loved his "Electric Avenue"!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gldHHrqacbA

It is such a great song that gets one fired up, thinking outside their own box about global dispariities.


I agree with you, JB:  great song.

Over the years, I have found the great sons of Guyana to be among the brightest scholars of the Caribbean.  One problem for that nation is that its best brains have drained to other parts of the world, leaving Guyana itself rather impoverished intellectually.

cabcool
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Ahavati said:

I must admit I had to go meditate, pray, and clear my energy because I was angry at such a judgmental person. While I cannot speak for anyone else,  I found his accusation that white people who are protesting are only doing so to dethrone Trump and care nothing about black lives highly offensive. While that may indeed be the motive for some; it certainly isn't for all.

I see eye-to-eye with you on that, Ahavati.  Dethroning the current White House fallacy is only draining a mudhole along the way; BLM issues extend far beyond that.

Those of us with close black friends, or black family, or just compassionate human beings certainly do care about black lives and want to see justice prevail.
But of course!  The human condition is a higher calling than a segregated voice.  Oppression from any angle or source cannot be tolerated by any human being. [/quote]

In regards to what we should call black people, I call them Black because they have asked me to. And I don't think it's up to Eddy to dictate what I call them when I've been specifically asked to call them black. Perhaps that's a personal beef; I'm unsure.
Nor do I have any issue with the Black nomenclature; the situation is far beyond skin-deep, anyway.  Of course, you must have seen my disclaimer: I did not set out to promote the ideologies of Eddy Grant, but I thought there was something provocative in his utterances that might stir another angle to the discussion.  When one extremist decries another extremist, the pendulum merely swings to the other inertia target without the possibility of intellectual parole.

I do enjoy his music and actually lived in England in the late 60's when his first number one song hit, Baby Come Back. He is right in that you don't have to like him to enjoy his music; however, I do quite like him, as well as his forthright honesty.
Wow!   I had no idea you were familiar with Eddy and his work.  He is sincere, if not a middle-of-the-road thinker.

cabcool
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Ahavati said:

One last thing I had forgotten to mention ( it's been bugging me all day ) was his statement that no real change ever having been accomplished by protesting. He then referenced MLK.

I am uncertain how he came to that conclusion, because the Voting Rights Act was signed into law only 7 months after MLK's tactics of  awareness campaigns, peaceful protests, sit-ins, and court action. President Johnson even said it was “a triumph for freedom as huge as any victory that has ever been won on any battlefield”

Everything that has changed in this country has been by protest and resistance. Look at the Women's Suffrage and Affirmative Action movement. America's history is FILLED with movements that changed our country forever.

It appears that he has some personal beef with America. I could be wrong; however, some of the things he said just weren't true. I don't agree with much of what he said outside of the white man, but I do respect his right to say it.

A necessary and welcome clarification, Ahavati.  I reiterate:  the views expressed by the artist are not necessarily mine.  Change is taking place all around us right now, as a result of the cry-out in the streets.  The peoples' voices are making a critical difference and the new future has overshadowed old, mediocre expectations.

I apologize for the second post, but I assume you've already read the first; thusly, editing would've been in vain.
Additional post no problem whatsoever.  The parts make a wholesome whole.

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