Go to page:

Should we be really scared of death? are you?

poet
dizzzzzzy
616
Fire of Insight
United States
7awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 25th Apr 2017
Forum Posts: 37

on with the show

poet
KDAmB
Tyrant of Words
Australia
13awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 5th Sep 2014
Forum Posts: 6358

hemihead said:You were dead for eternity (near enough) and will be dead for eternity again. I don’t see anything to fear.

The act of dying has some fear, if it’s not a good one (and by ‘good’ I mean painless, or at least fast, or hammered and doing some stupid shit, or doing something or someone I love). Death though, baby I’m ready. Now, tomorrow, 100 years…they’re all the same in the end.


indeed Hemi! I say what's the point denying the inevitable. Just the manner of departure seems to be the main concern for most of us(including self).

Personally, I am at peace with the fact yet bit 'worried' about not seeing the wishes fulfilled re the children and near ones. To me death is but a phase as is life, the latter being the conscious one.

I'll also say Madame's views are not far off from that of mine but that's a personal thing.


poet
hemihead
hemi
Dangerous Mind
New Zealand
12awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 1st Nov 2010
Forum Posts: 1333

KDAmB said:

indeed Hemi! I say what's the point denying the inevitable. Just the manner of departure seems to be the main concern for most of us(including self).

Personally, I am at peace with the fact yet bit 'worried' about not seeing the wishes fulfilled re the children and near ones. To me death is but a phase as is life, the latter being the conscious one.

I'll also say Madame's views are not far off from that of mine but that's a personal thing.



Ah well....it is useful, perhaps, to remember that your nearest and dearest too share this fate, so even concerns for seeing them flourish fall to the same rationale. It's often true that we grieve harder for others than we would for ourselves, and care has to be taken regarding motives.

To each his awakening, to each his day in the sun, to each his end.

(There are other points...death as blessed relief, death vs aging, death as choice)

The most important conversation around death, for me, is the basic human right to choose my moment.

poet
Duncan
Duncan Alexander
Dangerous Mind
South Africa
1awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 4th May 2010
Forum Posts: 2120

"Should we be really scared of death? are you?"

No. I am no more scared of death than I am of sex or my hopes and dreams and beliefs of justices and injustices.

What it means to be present, here now, happens, regardless of these things that I identify with.

poet
AEMelia564
Y
Tyrant of Words
Norway
44awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 20th Apr 2016
Forum Posts: 1958

However much I agree with lots of the former statements
My consern or pain does not include any fear.for death itself
Just that I wish for my son to be fine if Id die
The idea of having to "leave him" does not make me happy.

poet Anonymous

“I am what happens between the maternity ward and the Crematorium


Alan W. Watts

poet
Viddax
Lord Viddax
Guardian of Shadows
United Kingdom
19awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 10th Oct 2009
Forum Posts: 6241

It seems that I am the only one is indeed afraid of death. Not so much death in circumstance: dying in a plane crash or dying of old age, but just dying in general. But then that is because I feel I have done pretty much near bugger all in my life and have a ton of regrets, hopes, dreams, and desires as yet unfulfilled. The irony being that I am young and have plenty of time to do all those things and more.

But still, the thought of dying: of de-existing scares me into paralysis. I have no religion to cling to in the face of Time, and no cool calm collected sense of science to become all blasé about not being. The few times I ran through a plan for suicide in my head, it was often the idea of not being anymore that stopped the plan becoming action. When I think about dying I have to fight to reel my thoughts in; fight against the tide of despair and emptiness that is matched by nothing else. I also worry about family and friends dying, not on a daily basis mind you, but probably more than is healthy and than is simply a sense of how precious and important they are to me.

I am waiting for that apocalyptic moment in my life where I am 'reborn' and can shake this fear of death by having leaned over the edge of mortality and have come back; stronger and braver than before. The moment where I am remade and become better than I am now. But such things require strength, adventure, fate and motivation, which I do not quite have so instead I fear death and waste my time in cowardice and avoidance of my fear.

poet Anonymous

Life is a gift
and
Fear is the mind killer
Its a ride you know

Time is yours and yours alone Vidax
So go on and join the cosmic dance


poet
imohdanis
Strange Creature
  profile   poems   message
Joined 30th Apr 2017
Forum Posts: 3

As someone who considers himself an aspirer for spirituality, I've developed and continue to develop this almost intimate relationship with the idea that I will die, and I try to make sure that I understand this. Every. Single. Day.

In some absurd manner, it brings me a great deal of comfort, if not a great deal of motivation to live my life. To embrace the lows and highs of everything; perhaps, the best of all, is the fact it allows me to be free from the notion that I'm a prisoner in an economy.

Let me explain this in a story:

There is this very popular concept called "Die Before you Die." In layman's terms, it deals with the death of the ego.

One time, a Muslim Sufi Scholar in a credited university was teaching this course that housed many many students of various beliefs. Some, with no beliefs at all. Some agonistic. A whole spectrum of it:

The man, teaching this concept, asked them to write an essay about what they would do, if they were told they had only 6 months to live:

The students got creative! Some even illustrated the sexual fantasies they wanted to live, some spoke of daring heights and sky diving.

After recieving these essays, at another point, he asked, write as if you had 3 months to live.

This is where the submissions made a turn for serious matters. Some said participate in NGO's, go to africa, feed the poor. Some of course still made out a more creative bucket list.

And finally, the scholar asked them to write something if they had only 6 hours:

The submission would be an emotional storm; many spoke of reaching out to families, their loves ones. To forgive or seek forgiveness.

The moral of the lesson? It is knowing that you will die that should motivate you to live and accomplish everything that truly matters.  

poet
David_Macleod
David Macleod
Guardian of Shadows
United Kingdom
34awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 5th Nov 2014
Forum Posts: 874

I have faced death several times and I am glad to say I have no fear of it. You would think that was the view from a religious person with confidence in their salvation. I am confident on the other hand that no god exists. When we die nothing happens, it's the end, the black page and you won't know you're dead because you're dead

it is because of religion that we fear death, worrying where we might end up. We end up in the ground 'that is all!'

poet
escape_artist_322
Lost Thinker
  profile   poems   message
Joined 6th May 2017
Forum Posts: 58

No.
Only fear is not trying.

poet
Grace
Idryad
Guardian of Shadows
107awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 25th Aug 2011
Forum Posts: 13519

hemihead said:

The most important conversation around death, for me, is the basic human right to choose my moment.


Interesting point Hemi...what do you think of euthanasia? There are people who believe that one has the right to die when they want if they are in too much pain esp when dying of terminal disease.
However there are arguments about the sanctity of life and that life is sacred because it's God's Gift and none but Him has the right to take it away.

poet
Viddax
Lord Viddax
Guardian of Shadows
United Kingdom
19awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 10th Oct 2009
Forum Posts: 6241

Grace said:

Interesting point Hemi...what do you think of euthanasia? There are people who believe that one has the right to die when they want if they are in too much pain esp when dying of terminal disease.
However there are arguments about the sanctity of life and that life is sacred because it's God's Gift and none but Him has the right to take it away.


From what little I can understand, a problem with euthanasia is that of medicine and the Hippocratic oath: that most institutions however badly run will always try to avoid harm or causing death. Whereas with euthanasia the point is death. Can hardly have a doctor chopping off one patient's limbs to save their life but leave them legless and armless, and then snuffing out the next patient because they have lost their sight and do not want to carry on living. - It creates problems of reason and justification, on top of the elephantic problems of morality.

The past and history likes to find glory and dignity in those who have died before their time, or have faced death with grim determination, such as soldiers. It ha been taught and thought that dying for a good cause, is better than living for no cause.

poet
Grace
Idryad
Guardian of Shadows
107awards   profile   poems   message
Joined 25th Aug 2011
Forum Posts: 13519

Viddax said:

From what little I can understand, a problem with euthanasia is that of medicine and the Hippocratic oath: that most institutions however badly run will always try to avoid harm or causing death. Whereas with euthanasia the point is death. Can hardly have a doctor chopping off one patient's limbs to save their life but leave them legless and armless, and then snuffing out the next patient because they have lost their sight and do not want to carry on living. - It creates problems of reason and justification, on top of the elephantic problems of morality.

The past and history likes to find glory and dignity in those who have died before their time, or have faced death with grim determination, such as soldiers. It ha been taught and thought that dying for a good cause, is better than living for no cause.


Of course.Hippocratic oath. But if its euthanasia or maybe call it assisted suicide, is requested by the patient himself... lets say a person is no longer functioning and dying slowly and in pain..cancer for instance, but still coherent in his thoughts: doesn't  he have a right to ask those able to end his pain?
And if they refuse...are they delaying the inevitable and allowing extreme suffering on a patient before that?
I

poet
Umm
Fire of Insight
Latvia
  profile   poems   message
Joined 6th Dec 2015
Forum Posts: 1133

I don't know what it would feel like to be truly scared of death, dying is unfathomable to me.

Go to page:
Go to: